Quick guide for learning how to taste wines 2

Written by Admin on February 25th, 2011
Summary:

Navidad
If you’ve decided to do the hotel and training program for foreign professionals in Spanish hostelry, surely you’re interested in “wine tasting”.
During the course you can enjoy various activities to learn to identify a good wine, but with this little guide, through of three simple steps, you can start to become a great “taster” of wines.

1. Examine its appearance

Examine wine

To get an idea of the colour and other visual aspects of the wine it is best to use a white background (e.g. plate or tablecloth) and hold the glass of wine in front of it.

Brighter and more brilliant colours indicate that these are young wines. The darker the colours, the more aged the wines are.

2. Appreciate its aroma

Apreciate Aroma

Swirl the glass of wine to release the components that make up a wine’s aroma. Fruity and floral aromas are typical for young wines. More spicy (e.g. cinnamon), balsamic (e.g. peppermint) and woody aromas are indicators of aged wines.



3. Enjoy the taste

Taste the wine

A little taste is enough to enjoy the different flavours. Sweetness is tasted on the tip of your tongue, acidity at the sides of the tongue and the inside of your cheeks, salty on either sites of the front of your tongue and bitterness in the central of your tongue.
Common terms that are used to describe the wine are the following:


• Fruity
• Velvety
• Warm
• Astringent
• Mild
• Light, medium or full body
• Fresh
• Persistent
• Short or long finish
• Dry

WINE:

White wine

Rose wine

Red wine

SHADES OF COLOURS OF YOUNG WINE TO WINE WITH AGE:

Straw Bellow
Greenish
Gold

Pale Pink
Strawberry
Apricot

Ruby
Cherry
Granite
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